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Peter Hübner
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MUSIC & MUSICOLOGY
Theoretical Fundamentals

UNIVERSAL
MUSIC THEORY 1

I.
THE PROCESS OF
CREATING MUSIC

The World of
Enlivened Silence

The Origin of the
Art of Sound

Responsible Authorship

The Firmament of Music

Creative Music Listening

Writing Down the Score

The Conventional
Practice of Notation

The Error of the Interpreter

The Language of Truth

 

 

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UNIVERSAL MUSIC THEORY 1
The Practical Fundamentals of Universal Creativity
  PART   I            
  THE PROCESS OF CREATING MUSIC            
         
 
The Conventional Practice
of Notation


 
 
 
In con­ven­tional prac­tice, the no­ta­tion mainly con­tains play­ing in­struc­tions on how to use the mu­si­cal in­stru­ments, for ex­ample speci­fy­ing the pitch of the ba­sic tone; its over­tone struc­ture, how­ever, is not in any way noted down. In a con­ven­tional score, only lim­ited in­for­ma­tion about the spec­trum of over­tones can be gath­ered from the in­stru­men­ta­tion; thus only a lim­ited spec­trum of over­tones is real­ized in the ac­tual per­form­ance.

 
Lack of Understanding of the Symbols of Inner Enlivenment
 
 
We can pre­sume that in for­mer times, in the early days of this form of lim­ited play­ing in­struc­tion, mu­si­cians had a far greater po­ten­tial of in­ner enli­vened fan­tasy at their dis­posal, and had a sub­stan­tially greater for­ma­tive will than the mu­si­cians of to­day. And in all like­li­hood this mu­si­cal wealth was per­ceived and ap­pre­ci­ated with due re­spect by the lis­tener of that time.

 
“Music” without Meaning
 
 
How else can we ex­plain the impact that a ma­gi­cian of his in­stru­ment had like, for ex­ample, Paganini who, through his mi­racu­lous play, made his au­di­ences ask them­selves se­ri­ously whether he ac­tu­ally ex­isted as a hu­man be­ing, or whether he was only a figment of their imagi­na­tion (they even rushed on stage and touched the vio­lin­ist to de­ci­sively an­swer this ques­tion).

 
Time-Prevailing Insight
 
 
Only the enli­vened fan­tasy of such mu­si­cians jus­ti­fies his­tori­cally a no­ta­tion so lim­ited as the con­ven­tional one, which is still in gen­eral use to­day.

 
Realizing the Compositional Idea
 
 
Later, how­ever, the world gave up the for­mer, rather phi­loso­phi­cal, in­ner way of de­scrip­tion and, dur­ing the last cen­tu­ries, went through a radi­cal change to­wards a con­crete, outer de­scrip­tion of pri­mar­ily physi­cal phe­no­mena. Thus, the mu­si­cian of to­day ex­pects a simi­lar pic­ture of gross, sci­en­tifi­cally exact defi­ni­tions in the scores. He even con­siders it a great ideal not to de­vi­ate in any way from this ap­par­ent outer form of de­scrip­tion; and, try­ing to ad­here as closely as pos­si­ble to this seem­ingly fixed in­for­ma­tion, he sim­ply thinks as a child of his time.

 
The Music Scene
 
     
     
                                 
     
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                     
                                     
             
     
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