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MUSIC & MUSICOLOGY
Theoretical Fundamentals

UNIVERSAL
MUSIC THEORY 1

VIII.
THE PHYSICS OF MUSIC

The Dimension
of the Tone

Mastery over
the Instrument

Freedom of the Musician

The System of the Conventional Presentation of Sound

Unlimited Potential for
Structuring the Musical Sound-Space

The Fixed Tone

Modern Sound Production

The Long Forgotten
World of the
Microcosm of Music

Entering the
True World of Music

Musical Sovereignty in
the Inner-Tonal
Planetary Systems

The Inner World
of Power of the Melody

 

 

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UNIVERSAL MUSIC THEORY 1
The Practical Fundamentals of Universal Creativity
  PART   VIII            
  THE PROCESS OF CREATING MUSIC            
         
 
Mastery over the Instrument


 
 
 
The phys­ics of an in­stru­ment de­ter­mines its ideal sound – that sound, which exerts the least physi­cal strain on the in­stru­ment. Since an in­stru­ment is not an in­di­vid­ual, and there­fore is not a mem­ber of any as­so­cia­tion for the pro­tec­tion of in­stru­ments which might want to pro­tect it from pos­si­ble stresses and strains, the com­poser may well in­spire the per­for­mer to refine his play­ing tech­nique, to ex­pand his in­ner free­dom, to sys­tem­ati­cally ex­pand, and also to ap­ply, his mas­tery over the in­stru­ment.

 
Refinement of the Playing Technique
 
 
This means that the so-called “in­stru­ment-spe­cific sound” mu­si­cally can only ex­press very lit­tle mean­ing, and that it is only a very sim­ple groundstate from where the mu­si­cian be­gins to un­fold the world of mu­sic.

 
Mastery over the Tone Production
 
 
There­fore, the con­ven­tional fix­ated use of tra­di­tional mu­si­cal in­stru­ments is a sys­tem­atic mu­si­cal re­stric­tion: only a frac­tion of the pos­si­bili­ties of the in­stru­ments is ex­plored and ap­plied, and even worse:
the per­for­mer, due to this limi­ta­tion, is de­prived of the per­sonal ex­peri­ence of be­ing the mighty mas­ter over the world of tones, and con­se­quently never ex­peri­ences the up­lift­ing feel­ing of be­ing a true mu­si­cian.

 
Ob­jectice and Sub­jec­tive Limi­ta­tions in the Con­ven­tional Per­form­ance
 
 
If the mu­si­cian leaves the struc­tur­ing of the sound to the physi­cal struc­ture of an in­stru­ment alone, it will only yield a pe­ri­odi­cal, fix­ated spec­trum of over­tones which we iden­tify as the so-called “spe­cific in­stru­ment-sound” of con­ven­tional mu­sic.
Due to the pe­rio­dic­ity of its spec­trum of over­tones the re­stricted na­ture of an in­stru­ment ex­pres­ses only men­tal rigidity (since the in­stru­ment it­self is dead, men­tally rigid, and by the fixa­tion of its sound it only in­duces the lis­tener to men­tal rigidity).

 
The Musical Field of Mental Rigidity
 
 
The high speed of repe­ti­tion of the over­tone-pat­tern de­mands too much from the lis­tener’s ana­lyti­cal abil­ity. Due to the ex­ces­sive flow of in­for­ma­tion and the per­ma­nent repe­ti­tion of the spec­trum of over­tones, the sound as­sumes a fixed char­ac­ter.
Such a sound is retained at the pe­riph­ery of the mind like in a filter, and does not suc­ceed in pene­trat­ing the alert, quick and com­pre­hen­sive cog­niz­ing depths of our mind. There­fore, such an un­alive sound can­not stimu­late our feel­ings to lively crea­tiv­ity.

 
Uncreative Tone Generation
 
 
The lis­tener re­gards such a tone or sound, cre­ated purely from the phys­ics of the in­stru­ment, as con­stant and fixed, and iden­ti­fies it as the typi­cal sound of the in­stru­ment.

 
The Instrument Rules the Musician
 
 
Here, the in­stru­ment rules the mu­si­cian; matter rules over mind; the seem­ingly dead rules over the liv­ing.

   
 
It is a fa­tal “real­ism” of our sci­en­tific-tech­ni­cal age to ap­ply the ad­van­tages of in­de­pend­ently func­tion­ing ma­chines to a mu­si­cal in­stru­ment, which was never given such au­thor­ity by the com­poser, for his in­ten­tion was to put the in­stru­ment di­rectly and ex­clu­sively into the ser­vice of the liv­ing.

 
The Sys­tem of In­de­pend­ently Func­tion­ing Ma­chines in Mu­sic
 
     
     
                                 
     
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                     
                                     
             
     
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