GERMAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES
GERMAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES
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Basic Law of the Academy

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Introduction to the University of the Future

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Peter Hübner
Developer of the University

 

Faculty of
MUSIC & MUSICOLOGY
Theoretical Fundamentals

UNIVERSAL
MUSIC THEORY 1

IX.
THE SYSTEMS
OF ORDER IN MUSIC

Tonality

Differences
in Understanding as Reflected by Language

The Beginnings of
Musical History

New Sound Composer
of the 20th Century and the
Range of Intervals

Advancing
to the Transcendental
Play of Music

Musical Insight into the Culture of Peoples

Musical Relationships

The Musical Path
to Self-Knowlegde

Homophony

Polyphony

The Counterpoint

The Threefold Perfect
Form of the Harmony

Relations in Music

 

 

Astronomy of Mind EQ x IQ

Hall of Harmony

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UNIVERSAL MUSIC THEORY 1
The Practical Fundamentals of Universal Creativity
  PART   IX            
  THE PROCESS OF CREATING MUSIC            
         
 
Musical Relationships


 
 
 
In its sys­tems of tonalities, the world of mu­si­cal or­ders con­tains re­la­tion­ships be­tween sounds as clearly de­fined as our hu­man so­cial struc­tures. In the melody, the motif-tech­nique por­trays the coex­is­tence of the in­di­vid­ual with it­self, while the se­quence-tech­nique por­trays the in­di­vid­ual’s coex­is­tence with the other mem­bers of so­ci­ety.

 
Synthesis of Motif- and Sequence-Technique
 
 
At the height of ac­com­plished com­pos­ing, the syn­the­sis of motif-tech­nique and se­quence-tech­nique re­sults in an in­te­gra­tion of in­di­vid­ual and so­cial life, so that, from the in­di­vid­ual’s point of view, not only his in­di­vid­ual, but also his so­cial life is cov­ered com­pletely in this per­fect mu­si­cal pres­en­ta­tion.

   
 
The se­quences de­ter­mine the dif­fer­ent so­cial struc­tures of the mo­tifs – from small to large, from fam­ily to so­ci­ety and even larger; they pro­vide the in­di­vid­ual mo­tifs with the full­ness of the world of un­bound­ed­ness – from the in­fin­ity of the har­mony; for the se­quences are the mul­ti­fari­ous ex­pres­sions of the har­mony, this one great fa­ther of all the motif-chil­dren who in the worlds of se­quences ap­pears in a mani­fold moth­erly form – as a noble, loving guide on their great path of in­di­vid­ual un­fold­ment.

 
The Musical Orders of Power
 
 
Here the com­po­si­tion, in the di­ver­sity of its sys­tems and struc­tures, only elu­ci­dates the in­her­ent om­nipo­tence of that one great har­mony which is the basis of all se­quences, all melo­dies, all mo­tifs, and all tones, but also of all mu­si­cal sound-spaces, and which for the en­tire mu­si­cal event is noth­ing other than the mani­fold play of it­self with it­self and within it­self – for the at­ten­tive lis­tener mu­sic per se.

 
The Musical Omnipotence of the Harmony
 
     
     
                                 
     
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                     
                                     
             
     
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