GERMAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES
GERMAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES
SCIENTIFICALLY INTRODUCING UNIVERSALITY TO ACADEMIC LIFE
   Faculties:   Music & Musicology · Philosophy · Medical Sciences · Education · Pythagoras · Consciousness · Humanities · Natural Science · The Dragon · The Veda · Culture · Opera & Arts

 

Home

Site Map

Basic Law of the Academy

The Cosmic
Education Programm

Introduction to the University of the Future

Academic Institutes

Peter Hübner
Developer of the University

 

Faculty of
MUSIC & MUSICOLOGY
Theoretical Fundamentals

UNIVERSAL
MUSIC THEORY 1

V.
THE FORCE-FIELDS
IN MUSIC

The Musical Performers
and Their Laws

The Motif

The Masculine and the Feminine Musical Motif

Training the Free
Formative Will

Motif-Recognition

Motif-Technique

Power and
Powerlessness of
Musical Interpretation

Scenes from the
Inner World
of Human Evolution

Integration of Levels
of Creativity

The Differentiated
Apprehension of the
Power of the Harmony

The Perfection of the
Formative Forces in Music

The Melody

The Manifold Shape
of the Melody

The Path of the Human Character in the
Musical Form

The Sequence in Music

The Gate of Harmony
to the Outer Music

 

 

Astronomy of Mind EQ x IQ

Hall of Harmony

International Experts

Educational Program
Health

Scientific Research

International Media

International Congresses

Membership

Application to the University

 

 






UNIVERSAL MUSIC THEORY 1
The Practical Fundamentals of Universal Creativity
  PART   V            
  THE PROCESS OF CREATING MUSIC            
         
 
The Masculine and the Feminine
Musical Motif


 
 
 
The two most popu­lar main categories of mo­tifs in our known mu­sic his­tory are those of the mas­cu­line and the femi­nine motif. They find their per­fec­tion in the first move­ment of the sym­phony – in the art of the sonata. This first move­ment, which is al­ways in the form of the sonata, rep­re­sents the dra­matic and play­ful con­fron­ta­tion of mas­cu­line and femi­nine quali­ties – the path of mutual hu­man sup­port on the road to hap­pi­ness.

 
The Two Most Popular Categories of Musical Motifs
 
 
In gen­eral, the mas­cu­line theme – ide­ally rep­re­sent­ing mas­cu­line quali­ties of the hu­man char­ac­ter – is rather harsh, rhyth­mi­cally prominent, crea­tively ac­tive, and striv­ing for change.

 
The World of the Mas­cu­line Musical Motif
 
 
Thus, the mas­cu­line theme embod­ies not only the crea­tive, con­structive prin­ci­ple but also the dis­solv­ing, de­struc­tive prin­ci­ple.

 
The Creative and the Destructive Principle
 
 
Its natu­ral coun­ter­part, the femi­nine theme, is tender, charm­ing and con­cerned with uphold­ing the ex­ist­ing or­der. It com­forts the mas­cu­line theme, which strives for change, and it cre­ates a bal­anc­ing ef­fect.

 
The World of the Feminine Musical Motif
 
 
Embodying the sus­tain­ing prin­ci­ple the femi­nine theme smoothens the waves of the oc­ca­sion­ally rough-edged mas­cu­line crea­tiv­ity and thus main­tains the natu­ral flow of the com­po­si­tion.

 
The Sustaining Principle
 
 
How­ever, the categories of the mas­cu­line and the femi­nine motif are only a part of the world of mo­tifs and do not even rep­re­sent its high­est val­ues.

 
Diversity of the Worlds of Musical Motifs
 
 
Just as there are prin­ci­ples su­pe­rior to the mas­cu­line and the femi­nine ele­ment, there are also mu­si­cal mo­tifs which stand above the mas­cu­line and the femi­nine mu­si­cal motif.

   
 
In dif­fer­ent times – in dif­fer­ent cul­tural eras and on dif­fer­ent lev­els of cul­tural evo­lu­tion – com­pos­ers select the mu­si­cal mo­tifs of their re­spec­tive time.

 
The Musical Motifs of the Ages
 
     
     
                                 
     
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                     
                                     
             
     
.